2015 EENC Western Section Mini-Conference

2015 Western Section Mini-Conference

Environmental Educators of North Carolina Western Section Mini-Conference 2015 Western Section Mini-ConferenceFriday, February 6, 2015 at Chimney Rock Park at Chimney Rock State Park

EENC recognizes that not everyone can attend our annual conference, so we are providing a day long mini-conference for EENC Members, Teachers, and Non-formal educators. This networking and professional development opportunity is not to be missed!

Member Cost: $10.00, Student Member Cost $5.00, Non-member cost: $20.00 — lunch and snacks will be included

Mini-Conference Schedule

9:00 Gates Open, Check-in

9:30 Introduction and Vocal Warm-Up Activities

10:00 Session 1
Outdoor Pavilion-“Getting Your Nature Connection On” -Karan Barber

Indoor Classroom-“Developing Curriculum Based EE Programs and Field Trips”-Tom Randolph

11:00 Session 2
Outdoor Pavilion-“Using Children’s Books to get Students Excited About Nature” Kat Scala and Dottie Schuman

Indoor Classroom-“Bones in a Bottle: An examination of roadside litter as a source of small mammal mortality, and as an alternative to owl pellets”-Patrick Brannon

12:00 Lunch

1:00 Session 3-Outdoors
“The Hickory Nut Gorge Eco system and Winter Tree ID”–Ron Lance
“The Geology of Chimney Rock”–Anthony Love

2:30 Session 4-Outdoors
“The Hickory Nut Gorge Eco system and Winter Tree ID”–Ron Lance
“The Geology of Chimney Rock”– Anthony Love

4:00 Closing Activity, Form-B

4:15 Additional Self-Guided Exploration (optional)

The Mini-Conference is an great opportunity to work on Criteria II or Criteria III of your EE Certification Portfolio.

EENC is offering a limited number of scholarships of $100.00 to Classroom Teachers to help pay for associated costs (substitutes, travel, etc.).

2015 Western Section Mini-Conference.

 
2015 Western Section Mini-Conference.

Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont – Our Naturalist’s sanctuary.

Intro to Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont – YouTube.

 

If you have not been to the Great Smoky Mountains my grandmother would tell you “this is a place where you see the hand of God at work”.

As a native, Tennessean our naturalist was born and raised visiting these mountains.  She went to Tremont in Sixth grade with her elementary school and return a couple of decades later to get her Southern Appalachian Naturalist Certificate.