What’s a Naturalist?

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“To a naturalist nothing is indifferent; the humble moss that creeps upon the stone is equally interesting as the lofty pine which so beautifully adorns the valley or the mountain: but to a naturalist who is reading in the face of the rocks the annals of a former world, the mossy covering which obstructs his view, and renders indistinguishable the different species of stone, is no less than a serious subject of regret.”— James Hutton

Why can’t the plastic in the ocean be recycled?

Sadly, I think everyone has heard of the ocean’s plastic island, it is a huge mass in the Pacific formed by currents.  It is west of the Americas, East of Asia and north of Hawaii in international waters. Did you know there are 5 islands?

Does the plastic in the ocean have no value?  Why aren’t the ocean salvage companies raking it in?                    Why hasn’t some brilliant person invented a recycling vessel much like the fish processing ships?

CHECK this guy out – The Dutch Boy Mopping up a Sea of Plastic He set up a foundation, The Ocean Cleanup, and explained his concept in a TedX Talk: How the Oceans can Clean Themselves…he made the decision to pause both university and social life to try make it a reality.

Plastic in our Oceans  – 8 Million Metric Tons


Where is it coming from? It is being studied read this;

Science 13 February 2015: Vol. 347 no. 6223 pp. 768-771        DOI: 10.1126/science.1260352

Plastic Waste Inputs from Land into the Ocean

by Jenna R. Jambeck1,*Roland Geyer2Chris Wilcox3Theodore R. Siegler4Miriam Perryman1Anthony Andrady5Ramani Narayan6Kara Lavender Law7                                         

 ABSTRACT:  Plastic debris in the marine environment is widely documented, but the quantity of plastic entering the ocean from waste generated on land is unknown. By linking worldwide data on solid waste, population density, and economic status, we estimated the mass of land-based plastic waste entering the ocean. We calculate that 275 million metric tons (MT) of plastic waste was generated in 192 coastal countries in 2010, with 4.8 to 12.7 million MT entering the ocean. Population size and the quality of waste management systems largely determine which countries contribute the greatest mass of uncaptured waste available to become plastic marine debris. Without waste management infrastructure improvements, the cumulative quantity of plastic waste available to enter the ocean from land is predicted to increase by an order of magnitude by 2025.